Osprey Stratos 36 Backpack Evaluation

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The Osprey Stratos 36 is a ventilated and adjustable length backpack that is appropriate for extended day hikes, multi-sport adventures, and even lightweight backpacking trips. It has a suspended mesh back panel and seamless wrap-about hip belt that make it cool and comfy to carry, with a lightweight frame that gives excellent load transfer to your hips. Even though this mixture tends to make it probable to carry heavy loads with ease, the Stratos 36 also has a thoughtful assortment of pockets and storage access techniques that set it apart from similarly sized backpacks.

Specs at a Glance

  • Gender: Men’s (the corresponding women’s model is known as the Osprey Sirrus 36)
  • Volume: 36L (also obtainable in 50L, 34L, and 24L sizes)
  • Weight:  three lbs four.1 oz, actual (three lbs four.eight oz spec)
  • Pockets: 9, plus the primary compartment
  • Frame: Aluminum, wire perimeter
  • Ventilated: Yes
  • Adjustable Torso Length: Yes
  • Hydration compatible: Yes
  • Sleeping Bag compartment: Yes
  • Rain cover incorporated: Yes
  • Max advisable load: 35 lbs
  • Sizes: S/M 16-20″ torso, 26-45″ hipbelt M/L 19-23″ torso, 28-50″ hipbelt

Backpack Frame and Suspension

The Stratos 36 is a ventilated and adjustable-length backpack with a seamless mesh back panel and hipbelt that present a comfy and back-hugging match. Ventilated backpacks have a cavity positioned behind your torso that encourages airflow to preserve you cooler and dry the perspiration that tends to make your shirt damp. They perform quite nicely and are a desirable function on a day pack if you hike in hot or humid climate. On the Stratos 36, the mesh back panel is suspended more than the backpack’s wire perimeter frame, making a sort of trampoline that acts a shock absorber to cushion your back and hips as you hike.

Illustrated the backpack hipbelt
The Stratos 36 has a ventilated mesh back panel with a seamless hip belt

As you can see above, the mesh flows constantly from the back of the pack into the hipbelt, giving a physique-hugging match. Apart from improved comfort and manage, this aids get rid of any slippage of the hipbelt down your pants, so it stays on your hips for maximum efficiency and load transfer.

The Stratos 36 is also an adjustable length backpack, which suggests you can dial it to match your precise torso length, even if you ordinarily match among sizes. You do this by raising or lowering the shoulder straps in relation to the hipbelt, so that the shoulder pads are lightly touching the tops of your shoulders when the backpack is totally loaded. The target is to let your hips and legs carry the majority of the weight in your backpack for the reason that they’re the strongest muscle tissues in your physique, although your shoulders preserve the pack positioned close to your back and center of gravity.

The Stratos 36 has a rip and stick (velcro) adjustable-length shoulder yoke

The shoulder pads are connected with each other in the back to a thing known as a yoke. The yoke is connected to the mesh back panel and integrated hip belt with velcro, so you can pull them apart and raise or reduce the shoulder pads. Raising the pads tends to make the distance among the hip belt and the shoulder pads longer although lowering them tends to make the distance shorter.

The Stratos’ shoulder straps have the identical comfy and moisture-wicking padding as the hip belt. They’re also S-shaped to make them extra comfy for males with nicely-created and muscular chests. The pack has load lifters that are anchored to the frame as nicely as the shoulder pads. These are utilized to pull the pack forward and into greater alignment with your hips if it is pulling you backward. The shoulder straps also have two hydration loops sewn to the front to capture a hose, and sternum straps that can be moved up and down on a “rail”, for ease of adjustment.

Illustrates the trampoline frame
The mesh back panel is suspended more than the shallow air cavity developed by the wire frame.

Backpack Organization and Storage

The Stratos 36 is loaded with nine pockets to preserve your stuff organized, in addition to the primary compartment which can be accessed from the best or by way of a side zipper. Obtaining all these pockets tends to make the Stratos 36 an exceptional backpack if you have to have a pack for multi-sports adventures for the reason that you can separate the gear you have to have for diverse activities. There are:

  • two pockets in the best lid
  • two side water bottle pockets
  • two hip belt pockets
  • 1 front stash pocket
  • 1 sleeping bag pocket
  • 1 rain cover pocket

The Stratos 36 has a fixed best lid with a wide best pocket and a second zippered mesh pocket underneath, that has a crucial fob inside. The truth that the lid is sewn to the frame is great for the reason that it does not droop awkwardly or slump sideways the way that some floating lids do on bigger volume packs. The best lid pocket is substantial sufficient to shop hats, gloves, maps, and navigation gear, although the mesh pocket underneath is great for storing your keys, wallet, and sundries exactly where you can nonetheless see them when you open the pack.

The Stratos best lid is sewn to the pack so it will not droop when overloaded like floating lids frequently do

There are two side mesh water bottle pockets that are deep sufficient to hold 1L soda water or Smartwater bottles. Each pockets have a compression strap that can run inside the pocket or on the outdoors if you come across that less difficult to use. The side pocket mesh is reasonably tough but is not the finely woven mesh that Osprey makes use of on their extra high-priced, larger capacity packs. That suggests that the Stratos 36’s mesh is most likely to get ripped up if you catch it on a branch, but you can also easily  patch the hole with Tenacious Tape (see How to Repair Backpack Mesh Pockets with Tenacious Tape.)

The hipbelt has two substantial zippered pockets that are substantial sufficient to shop a Smartphone and many snack bars. They each have strong fabric faces, which is my preference for the reason that they’re extra tough than pockets with mesh fronts and present greater protection for electronics from the climate or impacts.

Illustrates the hip belt
Each hipbelt pockets have strong fabric faces and are substantial sufficient to hold a smartphone and many snack bars

There’s a separate sleeping bag compartment beneath the primary pocket, which is accessed by way of an external zipper protected by a rain flap. The sleeping bag compartment is not a shelf, but an completely separate pocket, that is substantial sufficient to shop a summer season weight quilt or even a modest trekking pole tent.

The Stratos 36 comes with a rain cover which is stored in a different pocket at the bottom of the pack. This pocket has a drain hole and is substantial sufficient that you can shop a modest water filter and rolled-up soft bottle, like a CNOC inside. That is exactly where I preserve mine given that the pack does not have a front stretch mesh pocket to shop wet products.

The Stratos 36 has a substantial front pocket with a center zip. It is a great location to stash your rain gear and snack.

There’s also a substantial pocket with a vertical zipper on the front of the pack which is great for storing a jacket or other products you want uncomplicated access as well. I had a small difficulty adapting to it given that I’m so utilized to getting an open mesh pocket on the front of a backpack. But this extended pocket can be utilized in a quantity of techniques that an open mesh pocket cannot be. For instance, you can shop all of your added layers for a extended hike like a puffy jacket, rain gear, hats and gloves crampons or microspikes or each climbing gear backcountry ski gear and emergency shelter, splint, and 1st help kit, and so on.

A extended side zipper gives access to gear deep inside the primary compartment

In addition to all of these external pockets, the primary compartment has a complete-length hydration sleeve with a central hydration port, so you can run the hose down either shoulder pad. The primary compartment can be accessed from the best, by way of a drawstring opening, or from the side, by way of a extended side zipper. That side zipper is specifically handy when you want to pull a thing out of the bottom of the pack, like a warm jacket or your toilet paper, when it is packed close to the bottom of the primary compartment.

External Attachments and Compression

The Stratos 36 has two tiers of side compression straps, which are great for securing tall objects like fishing rods the side of the pack. The best strap closes with a rapid-release buckle, which also tends to make it less difficult to attach snowshoes to the sides of the pack for winter hiking. The pack also has an ice ax loop with a shaft holder, the classic Osprey stow-and-go trekking pole holder, and a pair of sleeping pad straps beneath the sleeping bag pocket.

The sleeping pad straps at the base of the pack are removable

Comparable backpacks

Recommendation

The Osprey Stratos 36 is an exceptional backpack that can be utilized for day hiking, winter hiking, hut-to-hut trips, multi-sport adventures, and even lightweight overnight trips. Even though the Stratos has a comfy ventilated and adjustable length frame and several pockets and organizational characteristics, the factor that actually stands out for me about this pack is its capacity to carry heavy loads with relative ease. You can load it up with camera gear, climbing gear, or winter traction aids and carry them with ease. If you are searching for a versatile mid-size backpack that can be utilized year-round for a wide variety of activities, I’d unquestionably advise the Osprey Stratos 36.

Examine five Rates

Final updated: 2019-09-10 23:32:01

Disclosure: The author bought this backpack.

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